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Internetworking Indonesia Vol 2 No 1

The Internetworking Indonesia Journal (IIJ) is a semi-annual electronic journal devoted to the timely study of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Internet development in Indonesia. It aims to become the foremost publication for practitioners, teachers, researchers and policy makers to share their knowledge and experience in the design, development, implementation, and the management of ICT and the Internet in Indonesia.

Last year two journals has been published. The inaugural issue, published in the spring of 2009, presented papers discussing many aspect of internet infrastructure: wired and wireless network (WiMAX and PLC), middle layers (cryptography), web-based applications, and netizen’s lifestyle. The second issue, published in the autumn of 2009, was focused on Data Mining. This issue was guest-edited by Dr Anto Satriyo Nugroho and M Arif Bijaksana.

This year’s first issue was just published. This is a special issue on Instrumentation, Automation, and Control. And the guest editors are Endra Joelianto and Estiyanti Ekawati. The papers presented in this IIJ Vol. 2 No. 1 are:

  • Construction and Operation of the MARS-CT Scanner, by R. Zainon, A.P.H. Butler, N. J. Cook, J. S. Butzer, N. Schleich, N. de Ruiter, L. Tlustos, M. J. Clark, R. Heinz & P.H. Butler (PDF)
  • Analysis Throughput Multi-code Multicarrier CDMA S-ALOHA, by Hoga Saragih (PDF)
  • Inteligent Learning Objects (LOs) Through Web Services Architecture, by Ahmad Luthfi (PDF)
  • Industrial Control Quality Improvement using Statistical Process Control: Tennessee Eastman Process Simulation Case, by Endra Joelianto & Linda Kadarusman (PDF)
  • FPGA Simulation of AD Converter by using Giga Hertz Speed Data Acquisition for Partial Discharge Detection, by Emilliano, Chandan Kumar Chakrabarty, Ahmad Basri, Agileswari K. Ramasamy & Lee Chia Ping (PDF)

The IIJ provides open access to all of its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. This follows the philosophy of the Open Journal Systems. The journals are published electronically and there are no subscription fees. Such access is associated with increased readership and increased citation of an author’s work.

The next edition of IIJ will be published in the autumn of 2010. It will be a special issue on IP Networking and Services. The guest editors are Dr. Bernardi Pranggono (Dept of Electronics & Electrical Engineering, The University of Leeds, UK) and Dr. Setiadi Yazid (Computer Science Department, University of Indonesia (UI), Indonesia). For more information, please visit internetworkingindonesia.org.

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Memristor

Memristor is too significant not to discuss. But, wow, this is my last day in the office before my leave. So, here’s a Spectrum article discussing the matter :).

The memristor is as fundamental an electronic component as the resistor, the inductor, and the capacitor. Still, it hasn’t even been two years since a group of researchers at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, in Palo Alto, Calif., reported that they were the first group to produce such a component—which means there’s a lot more to learn. But in research reported last week in Nature, R. Stanley Williams and his collaborators at HP provided a glimpse into what they’ve learned so far.

The component’s use in computer memory was a foregone conclusion. The memristor can reversibly change its resistance depending on how much current flows through it. The researchers’ surprising new discovery is that a memristor can handle either data storage or logical computation depending on the amount and duration of the current sent through it. Three memristors can complete a NAND operation, the researchers report, so any Boolean function can be implemented if you string enough of the devices together.

But Williams is quick to note that using memristors as pale imitators of the logic gates common to silicon circuitry is probably not the smartest thing to do. ”Silicon naturally wants to implement the NAND function,” says the HP Senior Fellow. A memristor, on the other hand, wants to perform something called the material implication, or IMP, function, says Williams. Logically, IMP can be thought of as pimplies q, or if p then q. The reason IMP is such a natural for the memristor, according to the HP researchers, is that IMP is easy to implement with a device in which resistance—rather than voltage or charge—is the variable physical state.

One of the conclusions Williams and his team have reached is that ”it’s important to take what nature gives you.” To do otherwise would be like forcing basketball star Shaquille O’Neal to squeeze his 2.15-meter, 147-kilogram frame into a race car simply because you know more about speedways than hard courts. Williams explains that you could use silicon components to carry out IMP operations, ”but you’d have a very complex and ugly circuit.” The converse, he says, is true for the titanium dioxide–based memristor. So in a sense, HP’s results serve as a brief how-not-to manual aimed at preventing the engineering community from wasting this newly created component’s potential. The HP team says it has already proved that memristors using the IMP function are capable of universal computation and can compute with circuitry no more complicated than whatever you can produce by stringing together NAND gates in silicon.

Williams acknowledges that memristors won’t completely supplant silicon logic gates. Because memristors can’t inject energy into a circuit, silicon transistors are needed to drive them. The good news, he says, is that a single operation in a silicon transistor can trigger computation in multiple memristors. He notes that a processor featuring a grid of memristors that operates parallel to a grid of silicon transistors might be two or three times as large as it would be if it only had the silicon. But because the number of simultaneous calculations achieved by the memristors is the square of the number of transistors, tripling a 1000-transistor chip’s size by adding memristors would yield a thousandfold improvement in computing power with a negligible increase in power drawn.

The HP researchers say there is still much work to be done before a commercial version of memristor logic appears. ”But we are learning at a tremendous pace, discovering new things, such as the fact that the memristor can do much more than just storing a bit,” says Williams.

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UPH Seminar on 4G Technologies

I spent two weeks discussing the infrastructures for network services & contents in Gegerkalong Campus, the Learning Centre of Telkom. On the last day, almost without break, I had to fly to Surabaya for preparing a seminar. This seminar is a part of the seminar series Opening The Gates to 4G Mobile Technology that we have carried out in Jakarta, Bandung, and Yogyakarta. In Surabaya, the seminar is hosted by Universitas Pelita Harapan (UPH Surabaya). It was held at Hotel Mercure Surabaya on 20 February 2009.

The seminar was coordinated directly by Vice Rector of UPH, Prof John Batubara. Unlike the previous seminars in this series, this one was attended by the IEEE Indonesia Section Chair, Mr Arnold Ph. Djiwatampu, and the Rector of UPH Jonathan Parapak. The presenters, in succession:

  • Arnold Ph. Djiwatampu (IEEE Indonesia Section Chair), Opening Speech
  • Jonathan Parapak (Rector of UPH), Welcome Speech
  • Muhammad Ary Murti: Introduction to the IEEE, societies, Indonesia section, chapters, membership.
  • Kuncoro Wastuwibowo (IEEE Comsoc Indonesia Chapter Chair): 4G Mobile Technologies, network & service aspects, cognitive radio, 4G candidates
  • Arif Hamdani Gunawan (IEEE Indonesia Section Vice Chair): LTE -> evolution, features, architecture
  • Prof. Dr. Dadang Gunawan: IEEE Student Branch
  • Arif Hamdani Gunawan: LTE -> radio access, OFDMA & SCFDMA, implementation plan
  • Kuncoro Wastuwibowo: WiMAX II -> evolution, features, architecture

Participants came from UPH Surabaya and other campuses around Surabaya, as well as some professionals who study the field of mobile telecommunications. And just like the way I came — i.e. with almost no break — I also had to leave Surabaya the same way. Signed the certificates, and run for the flight under a heavy rain under Surabaya sky. But I was delighted — it was a very successful seminar. Thank you, UPH Surabaya :).

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WiMAX II

On November 21st, the IEEE Comsoc Indonesia Chapter will conduct a seminar to introduce the aspects of 4G Mobile Communications. The seminar will be carried out in Horizon Hotel, Bandung. You might visit Comsoc’s website to see the detail information. I will start the discussion by exploring the necessity of the items mentioned in 4G requirements. Then we will discuss the candidates of the 4G platforms: the LTE, the UMB, and WiMAX II. But we know UMB has been revoked by Qualcomm who then chose the LTE way :). I have blogged LTE a couple times in my other blogs. But it is Arief Hamdani who will explore LTE in details then. My duty is to describe WiMAX II.

You might have known the standard IEEE 802.16e, a.k.a. the Mobile WiMAX. This is the standard for the first mobile broadband access solution that enables the convergence of mobile & fixed broadband network through a common wide-area radio access technology and flexible network architecture. The OFDMA transmission is used for both downlink and uplink. WiMAX II, or  the incoming standard IEEE 802.16m is the amendment to develop an advanced air interface to meet the requirement of ITU-R / IMT-Advanced for 4G systems. The data transfer rates will reach 1 Gb/s, but it must have full backward compatibility with existing Mobile WiMAX. The protocol stacks of WiMAX II is as follows:

WiMAX II Protocol Stack

The objectives and advantages of WiMAX II are, among others:

  • Multi hop relay architecture
  • Self configuration
  • Advanced single-user / multi-user multi antenna schemes and interference mitigation techniques
  • Enhanced multicast broadcast service
  • Increased VoIP capacity
  • Improved cell-edge user throughput
  • Support of vehicular speed (? 500 km/h)

To discuss deeper on the issue, I invite you to attend the seminar. Visit the IEEE Comsoc site :).

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